Posts Tagged: Takahiro Kido

Films ~ signs from the past

We’re lucky that Japanese composers Takahiro Kido and Yuki Murata are involved in so many projects – it means we get a frequent release schedule from them that alternates between Anoice, Films and solo records, as well as other side projects.

Films ~ signs from the past

We’re lucky that Japanese composers Takahiro Kido and Yuki Murata are involved in so many projects – it means we get a frequent release schedule from them that alternates between Anoice, Films and solo records, as well as other side projects.

Anoice ~ into the shadows / Interview with Takahiro Kido

Wispish light suffuses the listener from the delicate ivories that grace the start of into the shadows. Given the title, one could be forgiven for being surprised, but long-time fans of Ricco Label’s headline act Anoice will be comforted that

Anoice ~ into the shadows / Interview with Takahiro Kido

Wispish light suffuses the listener from the delicate ivories that grace the start of into the shadows. Given the title, one could be forgiven for being surprised, but long-time fans of Ricco Label’s headline act Anoice will be comforted that

ACL 2012: The Year’s Best Album Covers

These are times of widespread disconnect, and music is one of the most genuine ways for a person all alone to feel understood. We’re seeing DIY backlashes against this loss of connection everywhere (Just look into the boom on homesteading

ACL 2012: The Year’s Best Album Covers

These are times of widespread disconnect, and music is one of the most genuine ways for a person all alone to feel understood. We’re seeing DIY backlashes against this loss of connection everywhere (Just look into the boom on homesteading

Anoice ~ The Black Rain

Yoko Shinto’s cover illustration is incredibly beguiling: simultaneously dark and light, mysterious and accessible, a treasure trove of associations.  We see a weeping woman on a cliff, her tears mingling with the rain and the flood.  The broken land in

Anoice ~ The Black Rain

Yoko Shinto’s cover illustration is incredibly beguiling: simultaneously dark and light, mysterious and accessible, a treasure trove of associations.  We see a weeping woman on a cliff, her tears mingling with the rain and the flood.  The broken land in